Samsung bet big on the next chapter in TVs when it decided to step up from regular LCD TVs to LED TVs and then opt for Quantum Dot LED TVs instead of OLED (as fellow Korean rival LG has been utilizing). Samsung’s reason for going with Quantum Dot pertains to the ability to tweak brightness and color accuracy while maintaining affordability. Affordability is key to making headway in the consumer market. No matter the display accuracy, consumer investment is mandatory to any agenda’s¬†long-term success. Apparently, Samsung is not alone, as analytics firm DisplaySearch has said that QLED TVs could exceed 18 million units by the end of 2017, with 100 percent growth in China in QLED TVs from 600,000 last year to 1.2 million this year.

And yet, Quantum Dot LED LCD TVs can always get better. That seems to be the rationale behind Samsung’s partnership with not only Amazon to bring HDR10+ video content to its Smart TVs, but also the company’s new¬†partnership with leading video display calibration software provider Portrait Display, as the Korean giant has announced a partnership with the video display company to bring Portrait’s CalMAN with AutoCal HDR calibration software to Samsung’s 2017 QLED TVs. The arrival of this calibration software for High Dynamic Range (HDR) picture quality on Samsung QLED TVs means that Samsung’s 2017 lineup is the first in the world to have HDR calibration software. Prior to this, calibration software was only available for Standard Dynamic Range (SDR).

 

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This HDR calibration software can be obtained in the form of an AutoCal calibration Kit, installed onto a computer, then connected to a QLED TV so as to gain access to QLED TV settings. Calibration software is essential for TVs in order to adjust picture quality that is often distorted when shared between devices (computer monitors and TVs, for example). Calibration once mandated hours on a TV screen with a remote control but can be tweaked with Portrait’s new CalMAN with AutoCal software in a matter of minutes.

Samsung’s QLED TVs are the world’s first to receive HDR calibration but are also the world’s first to have a 100 percent color volume that measures color accuracy, not just brightness.